hope.inheritance.power.

15 For this reason, because I have heard of your faith in the Lord Jesus and your love toward all the saints, 16 I do not cease to give thanks for you, remembering you in my prayers, 17 that the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory, may give you the Spirit of wisdom and of revelation in the knowledge of him, 18  having the eyes of your hearts enlightened, that you may know what is the hope to which he has called you, what are the riches of his glorious inheritance in the saints, 19 and what is the immeasurable greatness of his power toward us who believe, according to the working of his great might 20 that he worked in Christ when he raised him from the dead and seated him at his right hand in the heavenly places, 21  far above all rule and authority and power and dominion, and  above every name that is named, not only in this age but also in the one to come. 22 And he put all things under his feet and gave him as head over all things to the church, 23  which is his body, the fullness of him who fills all in all.

I took a syntax course in college — a necessary evil for English majors. Our professor would give us packet after packet after packet of phrases, sentences and paragraphs to diagram. It made my head hurt, quite literally.

Reading over this passage out of Ephesians 1, I thought how terrible it would be to diagram Paul’s sentences. He certainly maximized the content of his letter and managed to squeeze in as much information as possible. But amid all the independent and dependent clauses, three things stood out.

Yes, he’s giving thanks for the saints or believers at Ephesus, and yes he is praying that God will give them wisdom and revelation or insight, but check out verse 18 and on.

 that you may know what is the hope to which he has called you, what are the riches of his glorious inheritance in the saints, 19 and what is the immeasurable greatness of his power toward us who believe, according to the working of his great might 20 that he worked in Christ when he raised him from the dead and seated him at his right hand in the heavenly places,

That you may know. Know what?

Know the hope we have been called to. By whom? God. In whom? Christ.

Know the inheritance. It’s glorious. (I mean, let’s start with being made righteous before God by the death and resurrection of Jesus. And the list goes on, certainly not from my own merit.)

Know the greatness of his power. Who’s power? God’s. And not just power in the abstract, ethereal sense — the very power that raised Jesus from the dead and the power that seated him at God’s right hand. That’s some incredible power.

So what am I supposed to know?

My hope. My inheritance. The greatness of God’s power.

What if I earnestly asked God to show me these things each day?

Might be a game changer.

 

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